Friday, October 5, 2012

Colored Corn

They call it Indian corn. The call it flint corn. They call it calico corn. I was surprised to learn awhile back that you can actually plant it to come out in these colors. I really thought they were painted or colored in some way. Little did I know that you actually planted the seed to get these hues. Although they can be used in recipes, they are mostly found in centerpieces or front door decorations in October and November. I like cultivating corn, eating corn and looking at these fall decorations made with corn. However, I don't care for corn's use in mazes. They seem to be a craze around here. You know maize mazes! I have no interest getting lost amid an ocean of green stalks. I'll hang with the jugs of cider and search out the big pumpkins stacked on farm wagons. I'll let others go and get claustrophobicly lost in a maize maze.

20 comments:

  1. Your corn fits in perfectly with our 42 degrees tonight. Indian corn is a sure sign of approaching winter.

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  2. I had to laugh (and here it is 1:17 a.m.) about this post. Painted corn was a real rib-tickler.

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  3. Bro, I know that this comment is way "out there". I just finished "Calico Joe" by Grisham, a fictional major league baseball player from Calico Rocks, AR. The story was loosely based on Tony Conigliaro's beaning back in 1967. Joe Castle was a phenom who played for the Cubs and was beaned in 1973 by a Mets pitcher. I "lost it" during the final two chapters.
    "Legend says the town was named when an early explorer of the White River Valley saw the beautiful limestone bluff and called it "The Calico Rocks" because it resembled the calico fabric used to make women's dresses."
    I do not know why, but your words and photos touch me in very different ways.

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  4. The colors in your Indian corn seem to match the turning leaves of my woods. What a beautiful time of year this is and well expressed through your colorful corn. -- barbara

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  5. That's funny maize maze can't wait for your next story

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  6. maize mazes are amazing! sorry, couldn't resist. :)

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  7. Some of the best looking indian corn I've seen. Very colorful and seasonal.

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  8. Oh, that's so pretty. You hardly ever see any Indian corn here.

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  9. You found some really beautiful specimens here.

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  10. Nice ones indeed. I'll stay out of the maize maze too.

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  11. I was lost in a maize maze last fall. Didn't like it one bit.

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  12. So different! :)
    Happy weekend,
    Léia

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  13. I guess no one's going to get you into one of those maizes! Remember Steve King's topiary in The Shining? I never saw this type of corn until I came to Maine, I fell right in love with those colors. Oh how your photo displays the beauty!

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  14. Ha, I love corn mazes and cider and pumpkins also. As a kid in Arizona, members of the Tonto Apache Tribe grew blue corn. I loved blue corn tortillas. I don't know that they tasted any better but to a six year old a blue tortilla is very cool.

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    Replies
    1. The thought of going into a maize maze fills me with anxiety. Makes me very claustrophobic-feeling. Supposed to go to one next Friday, but I'm thinking a tail gate party on the "outskirts" is much more appealing! (like Elenka's "amazing" comment! Or, should it be "amaizing"???)

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  15. Fabulous colours! I didn't know these are called Indian corn.

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  16. I'm totally with you this one Birdman, pour me a glass of cider if you will!!

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  17. Love that image! I just put ears of it on the dining room table. I completely agree about mazes!

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