Thursday, October 13, 2011

Millstone

Here at Stroudwater Village, a millstone greets another fabulous dawn. Mostly used for landscaping purposes these days, there is a biblical reference. 'Having a millstone around one's neck' was not a good thing and quite a burden. Here's one I did not know 'showing your mettle' refers small flecks of metal which were known to chip off the mill bit when shaping the stones. They often flew up and entered the arms of the workers. A millwright's arms with many scars showed lots of experience... thus 'showing your mettle'. See, I knew there was more to this story then just a round piece of stone that years ago ground wheat and such. One of the originators of the term 'flour power', I guess. Yuk! Another bad pun.

17 comments:

  1. who knew?



    Aloha from Honolulu;

    Comfort Spiral



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  2. belle pierre , et avec une belle lumiere du jour derriere elle

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  3. Against the sun, like that, it looks like a grinding Stonehenge.

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  4. Fascinating bits of information in your post today. And, I would not want that particular millstone around my neck!!

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  5. such a fun adventure in word play and word history here this morning.

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  6. Love this image and appreciate the 'mettle' history.

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  7. Who knew? Now we know. Thanks! And I like puns, keep 'em comin'!

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  8. You really do learn something new every day.

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  9. Interesting! I had no idea!!!! Glad you 'splained this to us!!!!!

    Great photo...
    Betsy

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  10. Well, I enjoyed your commentary and I'll be darned if I didn't learn something...

    It's a great picture of a very large millstone which I wouldn't want hanging off of any part of me.

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  11. I always learn stuff when I visit. :)

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  12. I love this game. I've heard Mind your P's and Q's, either came from the British -- pints and quarts -- or the typesetters, p's were backward q's.

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  13. So interesting about the words!

    Your millstones are different from our ancient ones. I've never seen those grooves.

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