Saturday, April 3, 2010

Snug

Well, as I've said before on this site, language is a subject that really intrigues me. One of my many bookmarks I visit each day is:"Wordsmith" Each day I seem to find a trinket either a word I've never seen, an etymology that proves so interesting or a grammar usage that I'd never even come across before. Today, I have a word I stumbled across with my camera. Snug- Now, I've seen it used as a verb and adjective, but I have never even thought of it as a noun. After photographing this Irish bar, The Snug, heading up Munjoy Hill, I thought I'd investigate the word further. n. Chiefly British
A very small private room in a pub. noun
Etymology: short for snuggery Date: 1860
I also found that the history of "snug" began in Ireland in the late 19th century. It was typically a small, very private room that had a frosted glass window, set above head height, accessing the bar. You paid a higher price for your beer in the Snug, but nobody could see you. It was not only the well off visitors who would use these rooms. The snug was for patrons who preferred not to be seen in the public bar. Interesting! I bet my brother doesn't even know of this. This afternoon, I just might stop in here for a pint, if I can get away from the chores and the temps in the 80's!
* and no, I haven't forgotten Snug in A Midsummer Night's Dream-- all you Shakespearean scholars out there.

13 comments:

  1. Yes, I think you and my Irish twin need to visit this Snug and snuggle up to a cold one, especially today with temps in the '80's. Leave it to you to rob Florida of its glory!!

    Love ya!
    Florida Checks In...again!

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  2. Now isn't it just like the Brits to take over something started by the Irish! Fascinating background and also a fascinating building. Have one on me!!

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  3. That's a marvelous brick building especially with those bump out bay windows! I wonder what it looks like inside?

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  4. Hello, Birdman. Thanks for your visit to Pasadena Daily Photo today. I'm a word lover, too, so I will be checking out (and enjoying) Wordsmith. What a delightful post.

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  5. What a neat building. I wonder what it was originally, firehouse/ school? I like the reflection you captured in the pub's window. Great shot.

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  6. Great shot, great reflections, and surprising new angle on the word 'snug'. Thanks, Birdman. Have them pull a short one for me.

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  7. I like this brick building and the beautiful bow-windows.

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  8. What a delightful building. The name is perfect!

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  9. You get my prize for the most interesting post I've read in a while. While you are in there for a pint how about a nice interior shot? I am really curious about the original use for this place, what is on each floor, etc.. If I were closer I might do my own research.

    And thanks for putting me onto Wordsmith.

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  10. Very interesting, very beautiful building! I guess enjoying it with a beer its even better!

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  11. Marchin O'NeachtainApril 4, 2010 at 10:25 AM

    Great that you finally collaborated my explanation of over a year ago when you posted the picture of St. Dominick's church. As I mentioned then, there is an authentic snug in the upstairs portion of Bull Feeney's Pub in Portland. The similarity of a Pub in Ireland and the Irish catholic churches of Ireland are an important contrast. Many Pubs in Ireland have snugs. When you walk into a Pub, the bartender will ask you to remove your hat out of respect for the pub (hhmmm, just like a church. The snug is similiar to a confessional booth where the parishioners may discuss their private business with the priest. Many pubs in Ireland, have a "partition" built in to the middle of the bar for the purpose of separating the men from the women, especially on a sunday afternoon, after Mass where they can respectively vent. Great post, as usual....

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  12. «Louis» is also interested in etymology, but didn't know this about 'snug' either, so he's happy that he stopped by and learned something!

    (Editor to «Louis»: It's about time you learned something...

    «Louis» to Editor: You are about to learn how painful my horns can be when applied to your behind...)

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  13. Very interesting! And the building is so cool!

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