Monday, November 14, 2011

Ties

These are just a few of those ties that bind. Railroad tracks, that is. I found them stacked behind a warehouse on Read Street. Interesting phrase 'ties that bind'. I wonder about the origin. It's found in a Thornton Wilder play, an early hymn, a novel title and a Springsteen song title. When I hear this phrase, I'm immediately drawn to a connection with family. They say the ties that bind a family together are stronger than those that keep it apart. I guess, I'll let individual families tackle that one. Coming up on Thanksgiving, I think it's probably on the minds of many, that and the fear of tryptophan.

14 comments:

  1. bel esprit de Thanksgiving dans ton post, en effet les liens qui unissent une famille sont les plus forts

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  2. Tryptophan? No, you got me puzzled with that one. Oh well, there is always google.

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  3. I love the way we see the connections in your mind . . .from a stack of posts (ties) to ties that bind . . .etc. The books and stories I enjoy most are those that let me see inside the minds of others.

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  4. Our Thanksiving has already passed, but I could eat a bit of turkey and dressing, if someone invites me. One turkey per year is enough to cook!

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  5. What a fabulous photo.

    I imagine ties that bind was Shakespeare. Heard a radio program yesterday, and it turns out if there's anything worth saying, Shakespeare said it first.

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  6. I like the way you always compose your ideas, your creative words!I also like the composition in this photo!
    Léia

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  7. Tryptophan? I looked it up and am still in the dark. Now, however, the darkness is only metaphoric . . .

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  8. I like the effects of tryptophan on my family. Makes for a quiet afternoon :)

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  9. Those family ties don't always bind people together. In fact, they can be explosive. (Ever see Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) On the other hand, the train track ties reliably bind the rails together. Maybe the metaphor only goes so far.

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  10. When I first saw the title I visioned what goes around ones neck. I hated wearing a tie at work for to many reasons to say here. When I saw the picture I said to myself, how does one tie a slip knot with these? Great shot and title.

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  11. Whenever I see TV news reports on the workers from Thailand who save our Israeli agriculture in the south (the news is usually only when one is injured or killed by a rocket from Gaza), I start singing "Blessed be the Thais that bind . . . "

    Friends in Illinois built a log cabin out of railroad ties like those in your picture. I lived in it, alone, for a silent week in the woods in 1967 and there made my final decision to move to Israel in 1968.

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