Sunday, October 11, 2015

Square Lights

"Not One More!"
A month or so ago, I, along with hundreds of others gathered, lit candles and walked to remember friends, family members and acquaintances who struggle daily with drug addiction or who have lost the battle. The vigil and eventual walk starting at Monument Square were held to observe Overdose Awareness Day. The event, including speakers, was setup to bring awareness to the public about the growing numbers in our population struggling with addiction and the destruction and ruined lives among us. Just this past week, a family in our school district and a former student of mine committed suicide. His attempting to cope with an addiction that hounded him the last few years, I'm quite sure had a play in the ending of a 23 year old life.
With his whole exciting life ahead of him...
Two children and a loving, supportive family were not enough.
It's among us.
Seen in the faces we pass each day.
As we've all have come to recognize...
Addiction plays no favorites.
The damage done. 

19 comments:

  1. so true. it does not discriminate.

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  2. Society has failed us. Recently, with all the blatant and rampant heroin use here in Portland, OR I was wondering how and why there is so much heroin seemingly everywhere. I live in one of the better neighborhoods here and syringes are a common site, along with people nodded out in the middle of a sidewalk. Nothing is none. The police cannot handle the problem and so users are left to their own devices. But what I wonder is, where the heck all this stuff is coming from? I have begun to think that perhaps those in power do nothing to stop this influx because "they" want to be rid of those on the streets. I realize this sounds paranoid and wreaks of conspiracy thinking but honestly, why is there such an abundance of drugs that essentially anyone at all can buy them and why does no one seem to care?

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  3. Chilling.....thank you for reminding us!

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  4. A sad, but all to common story - everywhere. All my sympathy to everyone.

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  5. Thanks for the reminder, greetings.

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  6. I'm either blind or very lucky. Maybe some of both. But I have seen no evidence of drug addiction in the area where I live. I feel for all those who struggle with these things, whether in your family or in your community.

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  7. It's hard to understand the great harm drugs do. It all seemed so harmless back in the 60s & 70s.

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  8. How sad to lose someone so young with so much to live for.

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  9. Addiction to prescription drugs is so easy to come by. It often begins innocently and necessarily in that the drugs are needed for pain. But it's hard to quit when the pain goes. And it's hidden from the community for the most part. And it's terrible.

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  10. Very sad. I've known someone who took his life, but the circumstances there had to do with mental illness.

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  11. It's a bad problem and only getting worse it seems.

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  12. Sad and scary, and quite the same about here...

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  13. A sad truth in today's society.

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  14. It was good of you to participate in this vigil.

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  15. Bravo for Portland. I don't think we've had anything like this out our way. My work teaches me how serious this condition is.

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  16. Drugs do NOT discriminate; they invade families, those that are good and those that are not so good. Educating the public, such as the vigil did, are a step in the right direction. People can no longer just look away and think that they are exempt because they love their children better or more strongly. Addiction is a brain disease and it is a powerful thing. Loved ones hands are tied; no one ever knows, on any given day, what will happen. Unfortunately.

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  17. Glad you atttended and shared this...It's a very powerful force, addiction...

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