Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Five After

You'll find this large clock, frozen in time, on Congress Street. There are just a few of these left in the city, and none of them are in working condition. I would imagine you'd have to throw a lot of coin to get them tick-tocking again. This iconic piece sits next to the sidewalk, along side the former Hay and Peabody Funeral Parlor. If you were planning to spend some time at this establishment, this large black timepiece was an easy landmark, as you made your way up Congress. The first time I walked through the door was the wake for one of the gang. Teddy died on December 8 (I'll never forget the date) at the age of 19, a senior in high school. We always knew he had trouble with his kidneys, but we never made the connection that our lives might be this short. I'll never forget  looking around that room at the faces of my friends sitting with their parents. 
Some images are frozen in time.
This clock has read 'five minutes after Five' for many, many years.
... and I thought time never stopped.
Sometimes, stoppage would be a good thing.

20 comments:

  1. The clock is grand, truly beautiful. And I'm sorry about your friend. My best friend died a senior in high school, so I know about taking in the sight of peers in a funeral home. It is really something at that age, for sure.

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  2. beautiful old clock and post....

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  3. Sometimes I have the same sensation about places that are frozen in time ( and even some people ).
    This picture is precious, a great shot!
    Léia

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  4. Our first introduction to death as an adolescent or teen-ager is unforgettable.

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  5. Great shot !
    I really enjoy looking at your picture. There is something magical !

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  6. Interesting perspective on that clock. In Chicago the major public clock is on the Marshall Field department store. Chicago locals have said, "Meet you under the clock." for many decades. Believe it still keeps time.

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  7. High school friends that pass on when we are still young and free is a sudden awakening to the other side of life that we did not expect. The experience usually remains with us for the rest of our life. Nice tie-in with time. -- barbara

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  8. That is a sobering experience for a teen-ager.

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  9. Like the clock, your young friend is frozen in time . . .as is that funeral that you remember so clearly. Love the way images connect in your head/heart.

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  10. I'd be afraid to walk underneath this thing for fear I'd hear, "Your time is up!"

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  11. A sad memory. I was 16 when I lost my first friend, an experience that made me realize how fragile life can be.

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  12. Yes, sometimes it would be a good thing.

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  13. I love the corner shot of the clock and the reflections about frozen time.

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  14. An excellent angle for your photograph today, Birdman. Yes, we probably all remember a classmate who died young and shocked us into an understanding of mortality. As teenagers, we thought we would live forever. Until a peer died.

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  15. Excellent details and composition.

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  16. Even this old clock is right twice a day. I can't always claim that.

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  17. Great perspective...and so true about time...I lost a dear friend in high school too...I don't remember the funeral, but I remember having to leave an English class in tears because the poem the teacher was reading was all too poignant...

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  18. Sad memory, but perfect for your image.

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