Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Ft. Williams Swing

Really now, would you put you kid or grandkid in this swing? Take a close look at it. Yes, they look like stains of some sort to me. At 820 Stevens Avenue, my grandfather made us a large, wooden swing set that ended up being the local hangout days and nights through the seasons. I mean it was big. He used two telephone poles to anchor the main system. As I remember, there were 3 swings to take your chances on. At night or during the day, it was a wonderful place to 'hang out' and just shoot the breeze with friends. Who was going out together? What were our plans for tomorrow? Want to sleep out? Who was the better Williams or Mantle? I loved that set of swings. In eighth grade Ms. Storer had us memorize a poem and give a brief story about why we chose the poem we did. I picked "The Swing" by Robert Louis Stevenson. To me, it said it all. By the way, I 'nailed' the memorization, talked a bit about what we kids did on the swings and mentioned the great work by Grampa. But I'll tell ya, Grampa wouldn't let my butt touch this contraption that I found at Ft. Williams Park. Ha!

17 comments:

  1. It should be used for something else like put a flower pot on it instead of as a swing !

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  2. Ew! That's exactly what I was thinking before I read your post. That thing should be retired. "The Swing" --- what a great choice for a young man in 8th grade.

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  3. The swing may not be too great but it was a great catalyst for your wonderful memories!

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  4. So beautiful memories today!
    Anyway I think I would prefer the modern ones because this old swing doesn't look comfortable!
    ;)
    Léia

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  5. This looks more like a device of torture than a swing. Good shot, though.

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  6. marchin O'neachtainJanuary 4, 2011 at 7:50 AM

    If I recall, during the Fall, one of the guys decided that this swing set was the perfect width of goal posts, so one of us shimmied up the sides of the set and nailed a board to each side of the railroad ties resembling the uprights to a goal post in the end zone of many a football field. We used to kick extra points through the uprights........aahh youth!

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  7. Ah, swings. That one does look a bit medieval. My grandchildren swing much as I did: singing loudly, leaning back and looking at the sky.

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  8. I couldn't agree more! It looks like an implement of torture. YOu made me remember the swing set my sisters and I shared when we were kids. A lot of fun was had on that contraption.

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  9. Bird, we are all getting soft. When I was a kid that would have been the norm. I survived and you survived. We were lucky to have ANY kind of swing.

    The answer is Williams.

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  10. In a word...ewww!
    When I was a child, my Dad made me a swing...it constantly broke and dropped me to the ground! Ouch!
    ☼ Sunny

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  11. Looks like some sort of torture device! We memorized "The Swing" in grade 3 many moons ago - I loved it then and can still recite it. Thanks for the memory tweak.

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  12. Yes, we were very lucky to have a grandpa that worked with his hands. As I recall your first desk was honed by grandpa. I remember down the basement seeing him working tirelessly on that desk. I remember it in your room on Stevens and how you kept it so neatly stocked. It's now at my house in Florida having been used by many, but it has a history; grandpa lives on.

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  13. NO kid I know would be placed in that swing!

    The answer to who was the better ball player: Ted Williams!!

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  14. Redpat is right...it does look like a torture device.

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  15. I have to agree with Redpat too. Bet it pinched plenty of legs.

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  16. Armored jockstrap!! It looks painful just thinking about it.

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  17. Awesome PIC BirdMan

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