Sunday, August 17, 2014

Belties

Connecting the dots...
I'm not really up on my cattle history and my animal breeding techniques. So after passing this farm a few times, I had to do some cattle homework. As you might imagine, Galloway cattle get its name from the Galloway region of Scotland. They were first introduced to American soil in 1882. These are Belted Galloways grazing on a farm in Freeport. They are created by breeding the classic Galloway with Dutch Belted cattle. It gets its name from the white stripe around its midriff. Now you are probably wondering, Hey Birdman the stripe is all well and good, but what's the deal with the black dot? I'm about to give you that information. And the answer is... I have no idea where the dot comes from, so there. I could tell you that this cow is the results of breeding the Dutch Belties with the infamous Italian Dots, but that would be a lie.
Be careful, in my formative years I loved 'connecting the dots' in those workbooks.
I could also tell a pretty good lie.
On a Sunday morning, this must be shocking to you.
Dot, dot, dash, dot...

20 comments:

  1. Rats! Dina took the words right out of my laptop. :-)

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  2. Well that's a first, haven't seen these unique markings before, nicely 'spotted' Birdman :)

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  3. have never seen one with a dot! how very cool!

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  4. I guess those cows never learned that black around the middle is much more flattering than white.

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  5. That cow, or whatever it is, was the only one in the herd with a dot. Don't know if it had one on the other side. Cool.

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  6. I have never seen a cow with a big dot like that! Looks like a bullseye.

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  7. The best cow I've ever seen & I love your answer to the mystery. These must be near Wolf's Neck Farm? I love that area.
    "The most outrageous lies that can be invented will find believers if a man only tells them with all his might." Mark Twain

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  8. We have some kind of pigs with this kind of mantle, but I have never seen the dot!

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  9. There is a farm just northwest of the city of Ocala that has a herd of these cattle. I didn't know what they were called or where they came from. For a time they were accompanied by about a dozen zebras. I know even less about where they came from.

    But I do enjoy a good belt now and then.

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  10. A most photogenic cattle bread. There's a farm just south of town that raises some of them. They are beef cattle noted for their tasty meat which is tender, good tasting, and low in fat. As for the dot, don't worry about it. Likely just genetic variation.

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  11. We learn something every day!

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  12. I have been trying to talk my husband into getting some Belted Galloways. They are also known as, "Oreo Cows".

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  13. That big white belt suggests that you have found golf-playing cows.

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  14. Michelle beat me to it. They're known as Oreo cookie cows out west. And I'd brand the dotted one an Oreo Cookie Cut Out cow.

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  15. I consult my wife in such matters. Her family farm was mostly dairy but I don't think they had anything that looked like this. My experience was more like cows painted on the side of milk trucks.

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  16. That unusual dot may keep that cow from going to market! My g-daughter is showing her beltie this week at the Union Fair. . . we see lots and lots of the beautiful belties . . .

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  17. Peaceful and serene bovines.

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